NYC Recovery Retrospective

On the occasion that is the eve marking the anniversary of the most deadly
attack on our nation, September 11, 2001, I want to take a moment to
recognize the heroes in our community. Before I continue with that message,
however, I believe it is important that we not forget the death and
suffering of the victims and rescuers, and to recognize those of you reading
this message that have suffered the loss of friends and family one year ago
in NYC, or the Pentagon… Much has been said about the heroic efforts of professional public safety
personnel, individual citizens, and our public officials on that day. More
eloquent voices than mine have documented the monumental efforts of the
rescue crews, and the sacrifice and contribution of the thousands of
volunteers who helped with the recovery. I will not try to add to that
chorus.

I would, however, like to talk about some of those recovery volunteers;
Amateur Radio operators. They came from all over the nation, but
particularly from the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic states. Most came from the
ARES community, but also individuals and teams from Amateur Radio clubs
participated. Subtle, but important support for their efforts was also
garnered from family and employers. We (EMA) proudly sent two teams of
volunteers to the New York City recovery area (a.k.a “ground zero”), after
it was certain that we would not be needed in our home community. It is my
distinct honor to acknowledge the efforts of our volunteers in that mutual
assistance team effort.

Within an hour after the attack, ARES volunteers and key club individuals
help activate every important repeater and network throughout EMA, as we
tried to ascertain if the attack was extended to Boston. Phone and cell
phone service was crippled at the time, but as we were to learn that
afternoon, from the public overwhelming it and not from battle damage.

Once the situation had clarified itself, the ARES DEC staff and other key
ARES members swung into action. We had assistance from several clubs,
including a complete Emergency Radio Team from the Boston Amateur Radio Club
(BARC). The situation was chaotic down there, and it took the better part
of two days to get it figured out. My able partner was in this early effort
was Paul Vanasse, W1PEV, of RI. Paul assumed “command” of the RI effort and
worked together with me to send a contingent of MA and RI hams to the area,
once the particulars of logistics and security could be worked out. We
shared information, intelligence, and honed our strategy until the winning
one was arrived at. Those of you, who know Paul, know that he is man of
energy and determination, as well as having a pleasant and positive
attitude.

On our end, I needed someone to lead our team to the area. He had to be an
ARES “professional”, and available. That was Steve Schwarm, W3EVE, thanks
in part to his employer, EMC, and his family. Steve has years of public
service experience as a ham, and has held various positions in the ARRL
field program. Steve also has experience working with such groups as his
church and the Boy Scouts, and has such understands how to motivate support
in clubs etc. Steve organized a superb team of experienced hams, including
such veterans as Middlesex DEC Ed, N1VSJ, and former Norfolk/Bristol DEC,
Lou, N1UEC. Lou brought his formidable technical talents to bear in the
face of what was originally characterized as “electronic hell” by the LI/NYC
SEC. I also had a most able logistic assistant, Bob Salow, WA1IDA, in
obtaining much needed safety supplies for our deploying volunteers.

It is just as important the note the dedication (“courage”) of the other DEC
’s to remain in our home area. All wanted to go, but they realized that
they might be needed to respond to any possible additional attack in our
home area. Since the attack occurred in the zenith of the hurricane season,
Rob, KD1CY, was needed to respond to any weather exigency. Since the most
vulnerable area to hurricanes is Cape Cod and the Islands, Frank’s WQ1O,
continued presence there was crucial. This was all happening just a few
days after the attack, and we did not know if Boston was next. That is why
it was important to have Bill, N1VUX in place in the city, and he also
worked tirelessly on the website keeping everyone informed.

Finally, I want to again thank those ARES members who went to the NYC area,
performing so well that I received several phone calls and emails praising
our effort. Your readiness, preparation, and dedication were amply evident
to those we served. We even had a complete team in reserve, ready to deploy
to the area for a period in the October timeframe, headed by Carl,N1FY.
Although they were ultimately not needed, their effort to get ready and
remain in standby is very noteworthy.

For those who have been ARES members for years, and those of you who have
just joined us, thanks for being there! My best to you and your family.

73.

Michael P. Neilsen, W1MPN
Section Emergency Coordinator
Eastern Massachusetts Section
Pager: 1-800-759-8888 PIN 1155084
Admin: w1mpn (symbol for at) arrl.net
978-562-5662 Primary/Voice Mail
978-389-0558 FAX/ EFax Voice Mail

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Translate “Sales Leads” Into Prospective Hams!

Hello to all,

I am Trustee for the USS Salem Radio Club – K1USN in Quincy, Ma. This e-mail is being sent to as many Ham Clubs as possible from listings on the ARRL web site. We would like to try to enlist help from the Ham community with our efforts to encourage newcomers to our great hobby.

During the past year, we have hosted 6150 Scouts as part of our onboard Overnight Scouting Program. These Scouts have come from throughout the entire New England area plus NY, NJ and PA. We even hosted 14 Scouts from the UK back in January! Part of their 24 hours onboard the USS Salem is spent being introduced to Ham Radio and Morse Code. We have two complete HF stations and a VHF/UHF station in Radio Room 5 which are part of our demonstrations onboard. Most Scouts have an opportunity to make a contact on the air and have often gotten to speak with our good friend KE6ZYK – Mike at Mc Murdo Station, Antarctica! The Scouts also receive K1USN QSL cards, Official Radioman wallet cards, ARRL literature including QST magazines and most importantly- AN INTEREST IN AMATEUR RADIO!!

We need your assistance to help us transform these 6000 + “Sales Leads” into prospective Hams! We need to compile an accurate list of Clubs throughout this area that would be willing to give additional onsite demonstrations and offer License Classes.

Please feel free to pass this e-mail along to people from any other Ham Clubs throughout the Northeast that might be willing to assist these youngsters . Remember- The future of Amateur Radio is in the hands of EVERY Ham!

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Framingham ARA Extra Courses

Want to upgrade to Extra? Studying the 800 questions? Need some help?

Solution: Come to FARA’s “crash” courses!

Dates: Sept. 21, Oct. 19 2002

Time: 9 a.m. to noon

Where: FARA club shack in downtown Framingham (basement of the Danforth Museum building, entrance on Lexington Street next
to public library parking garage)

NO fee! NO text needed!

For more information, call 508-881-2301 (before 9 pm please) or 508-879-8097, or e-mail fara@fara.org

Thanks to FARA training director Ed W1NXC for putting together this great new FARA class!

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