New England Sci-Tech Now hosting NEWBS to Reach New Heights

StratoScience logoThe New England Weather Balloon Society is dedicated to the collaborative and iterative process of building and launching high altitude balloons to the edge of space to take instrumentation readings, record video footage, and conduct experiments. This club, hosted by New England Sci-Tech, brings together like minded tinkerers, engineers, and hams to work on exciting projects and launches. Open to all ages.

“AeroNU Project Horizon Presentation” at Northeastern University Wireless Club, November 3, 2022

Northeastern Univ Wireless logoThe Northeastern University Wireless Club is hosting a special meeting with the AeroNU Project Horizon project on November 3, 2022 at  7 p.m. in 503 Hayden (club space).

The club will discuss its upcoming collaboration with AeroNU. AeroNU is launching a CubeSat, and NUWC is supporting the construction of a VHF/UHF satellite ground station to be hosted in the NUWC club space. The team from Aero will be presenting on their work, and the communication systems onboard. 

 

New England Sci-Tech ARS (W1STR) QRV for School Club Roundup

New England Sci Tech logoW1STR will be open and operating School Club Roundup on Thursday [October 20, 2022] from 7 pm to 9 pm and Friday [October 21, 2022] 6 pm to 8 pm, all are welcome to come and operate.  New hams, youth, and anyone interested in ham radio will be able to operate this event on HF.

Bands:

All amateur bands except 60, 30, 17 and 12 meters are permitted.

Repeaters are not to be used. Only recognized simplex frequencies may be used. U. S. A. examples include 144.90-145.00; 146.49, .55, 58; and 147.42, .45, .48, .51, .54 and .57 MHz. The national calling frequency, 146.52 MHz, may not be used. Similar restrictions apply in other countries.

Suggested HF Frequencies:

Phone (MHz): 1.855-1.865; 3.850-3.880; 7.225-7.255; 14.250-14.280; 21.300-21.330; 28.440-28.460
CW (MHz): 1.800-1.810; 3.530-3.540; 7.030-7.040; 14.030-14,.040; 21.130-21.140; 28.130-28.140

More details at: https://www.arrl.org/school-club-roundup

JOTA at Camp Sayer a Success!

Rusty Moore, K1FVK, writes on the stars-radio list:

The Blue Hill Observatory Wireless Society hosted a successful Jamboree On The Air event at Camp Sayer in the Blue Hills Reservation on Saturday. Club President Steve Hillson, Tom Ulrich, Rusty Moore, Joe Fitzgerald, and John, Bree, Rhys and Tate Aldridge were all present to help. Also present were various law enforcement and security agencies (including MEMA) for a Scouting Explorer career day event.

We had full run of the covered pavilion overlooking the parking lot, and operated three stations: Steve and Rusty on SSB phone, and Tate running FT8. Tom handed out information packets and delivered a terrific introduction to the radio hobby to every group of Scouts as they arrived at the pavilion.

One of the most popular activities among the Scouts was our Morse code set-up consisting of a straight key with practice oscillator, and two wire-connected keys separated by 20 feet so that two Scouts could send code back and forth. John Aldridge and Joe Fitzgerald assisted with their code. The kids loved it.

Rusty kept tabs on the International Space Station and used a handheld Yagi to track the Station on three consecutive passes. Tate guided the antenna on the third pass.

The most memorable contact of the day was made between a young girl named Emily, who was visiting with her family, and PE1OAD/MM aboard a Dutch cargo ship out in the Atlantic! 

photo of K1MKD monitoring radio traffic from ISS
Tate K1MKD monitoring radio traffic from the ISS. Photo courtesy Rusty Moore, K1FVK

 

Young man getting response from a CQ
Rhys, Tate’s brother, getting a response to his CQ from a station in Newbern, NC. Photo courtesy Rusty Moore, K1FVK

JOTA Activity in Westford

JOTA-JOTI logoAndy Stewart, KB1OIQ, is hosting Scouts for Jamboree On The Air on October 15 at his Westford QTH.

“If you are available, please listen on the 955 WB1GOF repeater from noon until 3 p.m. on Saturday.  I will have Scouts making calls around that time.  Also, if you are able to join us on an HF frequency, we can negotiate that on 955,” Andy writes.

PART of Westford Planning for JOTA

JOTA-JOTI logoGeorge Allison, K1IG, writes on the PART of Westford mailing list:

The annual Scouting Jamboree-On-The-Air (JOTA) is the largest Scouting event in the world, and is held in the third full weekend in October. This year, it will be held October 14-16, 2022.
 
The local Westford Scout troop has several Scouts (and parents) who are interested in participating in the JOTA and pursuing the Radio Merit Badge and possibly an amateur radio license. If any PART members would be able to host a up to four Scouts and parents for a few hours during JOTA at your home station and making some contacts, please send me an email (k1ig@arrl.net) and let me know your availability.
 
73,
George K1IG

BIG E Space Chat Deemed “A Huge Success”

screenshot from ARISS contact

West Springfield, MA—The BIG E Space Chat was an unqualified success. Many hours of planning and effort went into making the ISS contact a reality.

Thirteen young STEM students who are taking space science workshops at New England Sci-Tech in Natick, Mass., were given a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity on Tuesday, September 27, 2022 to ask questions of International Space Station pilot Bob Hines, KI5RQT, orbiting 260 miles above the earth via a ground station in Belgium. Held in The BIG E Arena, a large entertainment venue, the event garnered much news and television coverage at the fair which attracts 1.5 million people during its 17-day run. It was an out of this world experience for the students from across New England.

Following several informative videos, hundreds of people who gathered in the arena, along with a national audience watching via YouTube live stream, heard from: Gene Cassidy, Eastern States Exposition CEO; David Minster, ARRL CEO; Fred Kemmerer, AB1OC; and Bob Phinney, K5TEC. The pre-contact show was choreographed down to the minute in order to assure a smooth transition leading to the contact itself.

At approximately 2:30 PM ET, the audience heard astronaut Bob Hines, KI5RQT, reply to the ARISS ground station, ON4ISS:

“Oscar November Four India Sierra Sierra, this is Oscar Romeo Four India Sierra Sierra. Over.” 

Over a dozen questions were asked by the youths and answered.

“The space station has to be flying over one of our ground stations… this one happened to be in Belgium,” said Bob Phinney, President of New England Sci-Tech. He told Springfield Channel 22 News, “The time had to be perfect. So the students got exactly ten minutes to get up and talk.”
“All the new opportunities that there are about new discoveries, new planets, and even new life,” said 11-year-old Harish Sathishkaumar.

Jack Warren told 22 News, “What fascinates me the most is the unknown…. There is just so much to learn!”

“The best thing about this work is that we probably changed one or two lives today,” said Fred Kemmerer. “The biggest takeaway from this momentous day; always to reach for the stars.”

The following day, Bob Hines tweeted this message from the ISS:

Bob Hines tweet re Space Chat: "This was such a fun event... great questions from all the students at New England Sci-Tech. We talked all things space: @space_station, @nasa_astronauts, @nasaartemis and more! Thanks for the chat! -73

 

The BIG E Space Chat team consisted, in part, of:

  • ARRL New England Division Director Fred Kemmerer, AB1OC
  • New England Sci-Tech member Barbara Irby, KC1KGS
  • Assistant Director Anita Kemmerer, AB1QB
  • Western MA Section Manager Ray Lajoie, AA1SE
  • New England Sci-Tech President Bob Phinney, K5TEC
  • Vice Director Phil Temples, K9HI

Third-parties involved in making the effort a success included: the production company Black Helicopter, Limited; the BIG E Marketing team, and Eastern States Exposition CEO Gene Cassidy; NASA; and Amateur Radio on the International Space Station.

Several ARRL Headquarters staff from Newington, Connecticut attended the event including: ARRL CEO David Minster, NA2AA; Bob Inderbitzen, NQ1W, Director of Public Relations and Innovation; and Steve Goodgame, K5ATA, ARRL Education and Learning Manager.

At the conclusion of the contact, the youths were presented with certificates confirming their contact with Bob Hines aboard the ISS, signed by David Minster, NA2AA; Fred Kemmerer, AB1OC; and Bob Phinney, K5TEC.

Along with “Space Chat,” NESci-Tech is conducting a 12-month educational space science program that includes:

  • Amateur Radio License Course
  • Model Rocketry workshops
  • Air-Powered Rocketry
  • Introduction to Basic Electronics
  • Introduction to Arduinos Electronics
  • Public Telescope Nights
  • Morse Code Introduction
  • Elementary Mathematics for Modeling Rocket Flight

You can learn more about New England Sci-Tech’s educational space science program by visiting their website.

A recording of the pre-contact show and ARISS space station contact can be viewed on the NESci-Tech YouTube channel at: www.youtube.com/watch?v=hdxnD8uF8t0.

Blue Hill Observatory Wireless Society Organizing JOTA Event

Blue Hill Observatory Wireless SocietyTom Ulrich, KC1OCY, writes on the Boston Amateur Radio Club mailing list:
 

I’m working with the Blue Hill Observatory Wireless Society and the local Scout council to organize a JOTA event on October 15 at their base camp in Milton; more info to come soon. I’m hearing word that local troops may be planning their own JOTA events that day as well.

73,
Tom KC1OCY
 
Thomas Ulrich
thomas.rm.ulrich@gmail.com
+1 (617) 571-8650
KC1OCY / WRCU734

RAO to Launch New Amateur Radio Learning Program for BIPOC and LGBTQIA+ Students with Support from ARDC

Nico Bezzerides, KC1PNP, writes on the STARS-radio mailing list:

I just saw this (https://public.nrao.edu/news/nrao-receives-ardc-ham-radio-grant/) and I thought this was really cool. There may even be an opportunity for us to partner with this project in order to fulfill their “connection with amateur radio clubs” requirement.


“Following a generous grant from Amateur Radio Digital Communications (ARDC), the National Science Foundation‘s National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) will soon launch a two-year project to engage BIPOC and LGBTQIA+ students in learning about the electromagnetic spectrum and the excitement of amateur— also called ham— radio. The new project, Exploring the Electromagnetic Spectrum (EMS), is expected to offer its first student-facing trainings in January 2023.

ARDC selected EMS because of NRAO’s proven track record in supporting underrepresented minority students in the sciences by combining mentoring and instruction from content experts with best practices in equity.

As a part of NRAO’s broader impacts-focused SuperKnova learning platform, EMS will combine the expertise of NRAO staff, amateur radio enthusiasts, and other subject matter experts to develop a scalable and shareable curriculum, introduce students to EMS and radio technologies through hands-on activities, and support students in attaining technical and general class licenses in amateur radio.

Amateur radio provides a hands-on entry point to understanding the radio spectrum and its practical uses, including communications, astronomy, and community emergency infrastructure and response. Early support and engagement with amateur radio has the potential to create pathways for students to a future career or lifelong hobby in the sciences. The $315,123 ARDC grant will allow NRAO to develop and execute the program for two cohorts of students. It will also result in the development of a nine-month EMS curriculum that will be freely available to school groups, community clubs, and educational institutions.

NRAO Director Tony Beasley said, “Amateur radio continues to be incredibly important to the nation and global communications, and NRAO is excited to be working with ARDC to bring a new generation and diverse communities to the field.”

73

Nico, KC1PNP

W0MXX: “Cubes in Space: Testing Vibrational Energy Harvesting on a Sounding Rocket” at Sci-Tech ARS Hybrid Meeting, July 26, 2022

New England Sci Tech logoThe New England Sci-Tech Amateur Radio Society will meet on-line and in-person on July 26, 2022 at 7 PM and feature: “Cubes in Space: Testing Vibrational Energy Harvesting on a Sounding Rocket” by Max Kendall, W0MXX. 
 
Max will show photos and discuss the planning, building, and launch of his recent Cubes in Space project. The rocket reached a maximum altitude of ~300k feet, and while the experimental hypothesis was proven false, a great deal was accomplished and learned from the engineering process involved. 
 
Bio: Max is a rising 6th grader at Benjamin Franklin Classical Charter Public School. He is the president of the 4-H Science Explorers, a mentor at the Medway Library Arduino club, and founder of the New England Weather Balloon Society. He currently holds an Extra Class license. Max enjoys working with robotics and has been tinkering ever since he was a toddler. He also enjoys eating sushi, playing Minecraft, reading novels, and climbing!

New England Sci-Tech Now Offers Entrepreneurship Club

New England Sci Tech logoAs part of its educational offerings for youths, New England Sci-Tech now offers an Entrepreneurship Club on Saturdays 9 AM-noon.
 
According to its leadership newsletter:
 
“As a logical extension of the Saturday mornings Youth Inventors Workshop, we will offer the same assistance in developing ideas for marketing and business development.
 
“The Club welcomes the professional expertise of Joseph Sliwkowski.
 
“Joseph has an MS EE from MIT with extensive engineering, management, and consulting experience. He also has 9 patents including one of the first software patents ever granted; started his own company in electronic design automation and created a new division for an established robotic automation company. Joe finished his career with 12 years of teaching & tutoring students in math and physics. “

BIG E Space Chat Leadership Team

Fred Kemmerer, AB1OC, writes on nediv.arrl.org:

International Space Station

New England school students will be making live radio contact with an astronaut on the International Space Station from The BIG E during the week of September 26th – October 1st. The “BIG E Space Chat” is part of a program to promote Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) educational activities and Amateur Radio learning activities for young people.

NEST Science Space Club for Youth flyer

New England Sci-Tech is sponsoring a 12-month STEM education program free of charge to all students grades 4 through 12 and Scouts in New England as part of the contact program. The program will provide hands-on learning about Space Science, Radio Communications, Electronics, Satellites, Rocketry, Astronomy, Amateur Radio, and more. Ten students participating in the Sci-Tech educational program will be chosen to make contact and chat live with an astronaut aboard the International Space Station (ISS) from the BIG E.

The contact and the associated educational program are a result of a partnership between The BIG E, New England Sci-Tech (a STEM education group in New England), Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS), Black Helicopter Creative LLC, the New England Division of the American Radio Relay League (ARRL), and local Amateur Radio organizations.

Execution planning has been underway for some time, and we are pleased to announce the addition of Ray Lajoie AA1SE, ARRL Western Massachusetts Section Manager, to the contact leadership team. Ray will be responsible for working with the BIG E team and our content production partner Black Helicopter to set up, test, and facilitate the development and delivery of a pre-contact program.

Ray joins and rounds out the existing BIG E space chat planning team consisting of:

  • Bob Phinney K5TEC – Education Planning and Execution
  • Phil Temples K9HI – Publicity and Promotion
  • Ray Lajoie AA1SE – Venue and Program Planning and Execution
  • Fred Kemmerer AB1OC – ARISS Mentor

The BIG E planning team is being assisted by Dylann Keaney, President of Black Helicopter Creative LLC, Barbara Irby, KC1KGS, Dan Norman, N0HF, and Larry Krainson, W1AST, in planning what expect will be a major Amateur Radio event in New England. You can learn more about the BIG E space chat here.

Fred Kemmerer AB1OC
ARRL New England Division Director

New England Sci-Tech Students’ Experiments to Launch on NASA Rocket

Rocket experiment payloadTwo students from New England Sci-Tech have team projects that will be part of a NASA rocket payload, according to New England Sci-Tech President Bob Phinney, K5TEC.

Their experiments were delivered to NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility and integrated into the nose cone last week. According to idoodlEDU CEO Amber Agee-DeHart, “The launch is scheduled [to launch on June 23, 2022] sometime between 5:30-6:00 AM EDT. Right now the forecast calls for partly cloudy skies that morning with light winds.”

To view the SR-8 launch (NASA RockOn/RockSat-C mission) on Thursday, 23 June 2022 starting around 05:20 EDT, visit NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility YouTube channel: <https://www.youtube.com/user/NASAWallops/featured>. Streaming will begin 20 minutes before launch. You can also view it on the www.cubesinspace.com homepage.

idoodlEDU Inc., is a501.c.3 charitable organization and responsible for business development and fostering strategic partnerships. idoodleEDU designs programs, curriculum and tools to help teachers and students around the world discover and harness their creative intelligence and to engage in more meaningful and richer learning experiences in preparation for a globally connected, knowledge and skills-based economy.

New England Sci-Tech is a non-profit STEM+ education center and makerspace in Natick, Massachusetts, dedicated to project-based, hands-on learning for youth and families across the New England community.

UPDATE:

 

NASA launch at Wallops

Launch now on Friday, June 24 at 5:30 AM -4GMT  EDT

See @cubesinspace on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram for more updates

www.cubesinspace.com for live streaming on Friday or NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility YouTube channel

 

Best regards,

 

Bob Phinney, K5TEC, President
New England Sci-Tech Inc.

Project “Big E” Receives Approval for Hosting an ARISS Contact!

Larry Krainson, W1AST, writes on the Project Big E list:

I just received word that the Big E Booth’s application for an ARISS  [Amateur Radio on the International Space Station] contact has been APPROVED! 

We’re working closely with New England Sci-Tech President Bob Phinney, K5TEC, and our New England Division Director Fred Kemmerer, AB1OC, to make this happen.

We’re very excited as you all should be too!

There is still much to plan and put in place.

But a great way to start your Sunday!

[For more information about the Amateur Radio presence at the Big E, and to get involved, see <https://nediv.arrl.org/2021/01/10/amateur-radio-booth-proposed-for-the-big-e-in-2022/>.]

Important Message from ARRL VEC

ARRL logoImportant Message from ARRL VEC

By Maria Somma, AB1FM, ARRL VEC Manager

The FCC released a Public Notice on March 23, 2022, stating that the amateur radio application fees, including those associated with Form 605 application filings, would become effective on April 19, 2022. The Federal Communications Commission’s authority to impose and collect fees is mandated by Congress.

The $35 application fee, when it becomes effective on April 19, will apply to new, renewal, and modification applications that request a new vanity call sign. The fee will be per application.

Administrative updates, such as a change of name, mailing or email address, and modification applications to upgrade an amateur radio licensee’s operator class*, will be exempt from fees. (*this new information was just confirmed by FCC staff on Tuesday, March 29.)

VECs and Volunteer Examiner (VE) teams will not have to collect the $35 fee at exam sessions.

Once the FCC application fee takes effect, new applicants will pay the $15 exam session fee to the ARRL VE team as usual and pay the $35 application fee directly to the FCC by using the CORES FRN Registration system. VEC and VE team licensing procedures will not change.

When the FCC receives the examination information from the VEC, it will email a link with payment instructions to each qualifying candidate. The candidate will have 10 calendar days, from the date of the application file number being issued, to pay. After the fee is paid, and the FCC has processed an application, examinees will receive a second email from the FCC with a link to their official license or, in very rare instances, an explanation for why the application was dismissed or denied. The link will be valid for 30 days.

Per usual procedures, examinees that pass multiple exams at one session, will have one application transmitted to the FCC reflecting the highest-level license class earned. Again, our procedures will not change. The new license candidates will have an extra step before the license is issued. VE teams can point candidates to our FCC Application Fee webpage. Our new ARRL VEC CSCEs also include information about the application fee and points candidates to the webpage. The FCC rule pertaining to CSCEs will not change. CSCE credit will continue to be valid for 365 days, starting from the date of issuance.

For VE teams holding exam sessions the weekend before April 19, the FCC advised that applications not received by the FCC before April 19 will be subjected to the fee. The ARRL VEC urges teams to upload sessions via our documents upload page to get your sessions to us as quickly as possible. Assuming the FCC electronic batch filing (EBF) system is functioning properly on Monday, April 18, the VEC staff will work to get these to the FCC before April 19. Email the VEC department at VEC@arrl.org for the upload instructions.

Additionally, the FCC stated that the fee for applications processed and dismissed will not be refundable. This includes vanity requests where the applicant does not receive the requested call sign. However, returned applications that are missing information will not require an additional fee, if the missing information is submitted to the FCC within the proper amount of time.

Youth Licensing Grant Program

Anticipating the implementation of the fee in 2022, the ARRL Board of Directors, approved the ARRL Youth Licensing Grant Program in July 2021. Under the program, ARRL will cover a one-time $35 application fee for license candidates younger than 18-years old for tests administered under the auspices of the ARRL Volunteer Examiner Coordinator (ARRL VEC). Qualified candidates also would pay a reduced exam session fee of $5 to the ARRL VEC. ARRL is finalizing details for administering the program.

Further news and instructions will follow as the FCC releases them. Details for the ARRL Youth Licensing Grant Program will be posted when available. For additional information, visit the resources below.

ARRL VEC Application Fees webpage:

arrl.org/fcc-application-fee

ARRL News Story: arrl.org/news/new-amateur-radio-license-applications-fee-to-become-effective-april-19-2022

FCC CORES Video Tutorials: fcc.gov/licensing-databases/fcc-registration-system-cores/commission-registration-system-video-tutorials

FCC Registration Help: apps.fcc.gov/cores/publicHome.do?help=true

Boy Scouts Klondike Derby Ham Radio Demo, Milton, March 12, 2022

UPDATE:
 

Thank you to everyone who expressed interest in participating in this weekend’s radio demo at the Milton Klondike Derby. Because of the forecast, I’ve pulled the plug (word choice intended) on the demo. It’s supposed to rain all day, which 1) won’t be fun for the operators, and 2) means that there will be a lot of cold, wet Scouts who will likely be more interested in getting warm and dry than in engaging with us.

I’ll keep my eyes and ears open for other opportunities to hold similar demo events for Scouts in the future.

73,
Tom KC1OCY

 
Tom Ulrich, KC1OCY, writes:
 

The Scouts BSA Great Blue Hill district has expressed interest in having a few hams on hand to provide a demonstration of amateur radio during their Klondike Derby event at New England Base Camp in Milton on March 12, 2022.

We will be operating under the special event callsign W1BSA. (Thank you to Pi K1RV for use of the callsign.)

The base camp is in the Blue Hills State Reserve (K-8402); as such this event could count as a POTA activation.

If you’re interested in participating, please fill out this sign up sheet, including whether you’d like to attend and operate in person or monitor the airwaves for calls from the event. Details are still being worked out with the derby organizers, including the number of operators that they’d like to have attend; please don’t be offended if in the end we have more hams interested than can be hosted.

If you have questions, send them my way.

73,
Tom, KC1OCY
===
Thomas R.M. Ulrich
thomas.rm.ulrich@gmail.com
+1 (617) 571-8650
KC1OCY / WRCU734

Amateur Extra “Continuous” License Classes Online, March-November, 2022 at New England Sci-Tech in Natick

From nescitech.org:New England Sci Tech logo

ONLINE COURSE – ADVANCED LEVEL – AE LICENSE

This ONLINE ham radio license course will get you ready to take the Ham Radio AMATEUR EXTRA license exam, the THIRD of three certification levels. Geared toward adults, as well as junior high, high school, and home-school students. Yes, we give online ham radio exams, too! (See below)

This is a FULL course taught by a 40-yr veteran teacher, not a discussion group or video service. You will learn much more than just watching a video or buying a book. You get a full 24 hours of instruction over eight 3-hour classes. Take the course from anywhere – it’s ONLINE!

Topics range from the science of radio electronics to the FCC rules governing the radio spectrum. Recommended text: ARRL Extra Class License Manual, 12th edition, for exams through June 30, 2024, (purchase on ARRL website). Regular practice and study is necessary to get the best results from this course.

NOTE: You MUST have a thorough understanding of the Technician and General level material before taking this course.  If you are already a licensed General but have been away from radio for a while, you may request to audit (at half price) one of our Tech and General courses to catch up.

Amateur radio (or “ham radio”) is used by people all over the world to communicate over radio waves. Some people use ham radio for emergency preparedness, to provide communications support for community events, to report on severe weather and natural disasters, as a social activity, and even occasionally to contact crew members on the International Space Station!

2022 ONLINE HAM RADIO COURSE FOR AMATEUR EXTRA LICENSE

Class Rotation: Classes are taught almost every Sunday evening and repeat every 8 weeks.

Because the order of topics is less important at the Extra level, you may jump into the sequence at certain start points* and take 8 classes to cover all 10 of the question pool topics.

*Starting Sun Mar 13, 7-10pm Eastern – 8 classes 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8
Continuing Sun Mar 20, 7-10pm Eastern – class 2
Continuing Sun Mar 27, 7-10pm Eastern – class 3
*Starting Sun Apr 3, 7-10pm Eastern – 8 classes 4,5,6,7,8,1,2,3
Continuing Sun Apr 10, 7-10pm Eastern – classes 5
*Starting Sun Apr 17, 7-10pm Eastern – 8 classes 6,7,8,1,2,3,4,5
Continuing Sun Apr 24, 7-10pm Eastern – classes 7
Continuing Sun May 1, 7-10pm Eastern – classes 8

*Starting Sun May 15, 7-10pm Eastern – 8 classes 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8
Continuing Sun May 22, 7-10pm Eastern – class 2
Continuing Sun May 29, 7-10pm Eastern – class 3
*Starting Sun June 5, 7-10pm Eastern – 8 classes 4,5,6,7,8,1,2,3
Continuing Sun June 12, 7-10pm Eastern – classes 5
*Starting Sun June 19, 7-10pm Eastern – 8 classes 6,7,8,1,2,3,4,5
Continuing Sun June 26, 7-10pm Eastern – classes 7
Continuing Sun July 3, 7-10pm Eastern – classes 8

*Starting Sun July 24, 7-10pm Eastern – 8 classes 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8
Continuing Sun July 31, 7-10pm Eastern – class 2
Continuing Sun Aug 7, 7-10pm Eastern – class 3
*Starting Sun Aug 14, 7-10pm Eastern – 8 classes 4,5,6,7,8,1,2,3
Continuing Sun Aug 21, 7-10pm Eastern – class 5
*Starting Sun Aug 28, 7-10pm Eastern – 8 classes 6,7,8,1,2,3,4,5
Continuing Sun Sep 4, 7-10pm Eastern – class 7
Continuing Sun Sep 11, 7-10pm Eastern – class 8

*Starting Sun Oct 2, 7-10pm Eastern – 8 classes 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8
Continuing Sun Oct 9, 7-10pm Eastern – class 2
Continuing Sun Oct 16, 7-10pm Eastern – class 3
*Starting Sun Oct 23, 7-10pm Eastern – 8 classes 4,5,6,7,8,1,2,3
Continuing Sun Oct 30, 7-10pm Eastern – class 5
*Starting Sun Nov 6, 7-10pm Eastern – 8 classes 6,7,8,1,2,3,4,5
Continuing Sun Nov 13, 7-10pm Eastern – class 7
Continuing Sun Nov 20, 7-10pm Eastern – class 8

etc.

Included with course: You will get downloadable lecture study guides and charts, FREE access to our weekly Online Radio Shop Talk sessions, FREE enrollment in any of our Morse Code classes, and a guest pass to the Sci-Tech Radio Rooms and online radio club meetings for 3 months.

Family Free: Additional members of the same family may join this course at no extra charge, if sharing one computer and zoom screen.

System Requirements: Computer or Chromebook capable of running ZOOM Meeting, either by Zoom app or through a web browser, a web camera/mic, and a printer.

Zoom Link: Approximately 2 days before the session begins you will receive an email with instructions to access the course details, documents, and Zoom link. If you don’t see the email, check your spam filter. If you still don’t see it, call or email us.

Please be aware of our Cancellation and Refund Policies. For questions, e-mail info@nescitech.org or call 508-720-4179.

LICENSE EXAMS

YES, our exam team is authorized to give ONLINE exams, so you can schedule your FCC AMATEUR EXTRA exam within a few days of finishing the course. Note that we must collect the standard $15 exam fee for the ARRL VEC separately. (Fee is $15 across the country.)

We administer ham radio exams both online and in-person, having proctored nearly 2,000 exams over the past decade. We’ve taught amateur radio classes for over 15 years with tremendous success. Hundreds of people have taken our classes with 99% having passed the exam to become licensed operators. We offer classes for all three levels of ham radio licenses: TechnicianGeneralAmateur Extra, as well as Morse Code.

[To register: <https://nescitech.org/shop/online-license-course-extra/>]

Amateur Radio Demo at Boy Scouts Klondike Derby, Dunstable, February 5, 2022

Mindy Hull, KM1NDY, writes in K1USN Happenings:

Jon Lyna, KC1MII, is one of the organizers of the Boy Scouts of America’s Klondike Derby this Saturday, February 5th! And he is looking for any hams who would like to come and help out, play radio, and inspire some Scouts to get on the air. 

Thanks to Pi, K1RV, for letting the group borrow W1BSA as our call sign for this event! 

Limey (my green van) will be decked out in full radio apparel, and we will be setting up a couple HF stations, along with UHF/VHF. AA1F and I plan on getting there for the 2 pm set-up.

Hope to see you there!
Mindy – KM1NDY
km1ndy.km1ndy@gmail.com

This is from Jon KC1MII:

———————————————————————–

 

WHO:
Anyone interested in introducing HAM radio to local boy scouts

WHAT:
HAM radio exhibition at the local Boy Scouts Klondike Derby

WHERE:
Larter Field,  80 Groton St, Dunstable, MA 01827

WHEN:
Saturday, February 5, 2022  Set up starts at 2pm.  Exhibition from 4pm to 6pm, later if there is still interest.

WHY:
To introduce local boy scouts to the hobby of HAM radio, and any potential application is scouting.

WEATHER:
Friday night there is rain and wintery mix predicted.   The high temperature for Saturday is predicted to be 23 with a low of 5.  

WHAT TO BRING?
Dress for the weather, and something from the HAM radio hobby that could apply to boy scouting.

GOAL OF THE EXHIBITION:
We are going to set several information stations, that can explain and demonstrate several aspects of HAM radio, and why the could be interesting or useful to boy scouts.  Topics to include but are not limited HT’s and local repeaters, Morse Code, and Parks on the Air (POTA) and Summits on the Air (SOTA).

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All the best,

Jon Lyna, KC1MII 

Kids Day is January 1, 2022

From ARRL Website:

Saturday, January 1, 2022, is Kids Day. The event gets under way at 1800 UTC and concludes at 2359 UTC. Sponsored by the Boring (Oregon) Amateur Radio Club, Kids Day has a simple exchange suitable for younger operators: first name, age, location, and favorite color. After that, the contact can be as long or as short as each participant prefers.

Kids Day happens twice a year — in January and June — and can be your opportunity to get youngsters on the air and mentor future amateur radio operators to show them the fun and excitement that ham radio has to offer. You might just be introducing the next generation of hams to the airwaves. Share the excitement with your kids or grandkids, a Scout troop, a church or the general public.

Look for activity on these frequencies: 10 meters: 28.350 – 28.400 MHz; 12 meters: 24.960 – 24.980 MHz; 15 meters: 21.360 – 21.400 MHz; 17 meters: 18.140 – 18.145 MHz; 20 meters: 14.270 – 14.300 MHz; 40 meters: 7.270 – 7.290 MHz, and 80 meters: 3.740 – 3.940 MHz. Repeater contacts are okay with permission of the repeater owner.

As with any on-the-air activity that includes unlicensed individuals, control operators must observe third-party traffic restrictions when making DX contacts. Additional details are on the ARRL website.

As many communities are taking precautions due to COVID-19, participants are reminded to adhere to social distancing and face mask guidelines where applicable. If it’s not feasible to invite youngsters into your shack, consider other options to mentor, such as using social media platforms or via Zoom or other non-contact means.

New England Sci-Tech “Cubes In Space™” Program Begins in December, 2021

New England Sci Tech logoSpecial Note: The students in the 2019 cubes program had their projects accepted for flight. One project flew on a NASA rocket in June and one flew on a high altitude balloon in September. The 2020 program was cancelled due to COVID. The 2021 project did not fly because of a shipping problem with the carrier, so that project will fly in June 2022. 

CUBES IN SPACE™ – Now accepting 2021-2022 applications

A specialized activity of NE SciTech’s Space Science Club, specifically for students ages 11-17, Cubes in Space (CIS), a program by idoodledu inc., teaches students about the atmosphere, rocketry, high-altitude balloons, general laws of physics, and space science. Students work in teams to design and propose experiments to launch into space or a near space environment on a NASA sounding rocket and zero-pressure scientific balloon. Students then submit their proposals and could have a chance to fabricate and fly their projects. Space is limited.

Students attend regular educational CIS curriculum workshops and team meetings in the fall, winter, and spring. GROUP 1 meets on specific Friday evenings 6:30-7:30 pm. GROUP 2 meets on specific Saturday afternoons 3:30-4:30 pm. Regular meetings are usually every other week from December through March. For teams with projects that have been selected to fly, there will be additional prep and build meetings in April and May. The rocket flies in June. The hi-alt balloon flies over the summer, usually in August. We will schedule additional CIS meetings in the fall for students to examine their flown projects when recovered from NASA.

This CIS program is free for student members* of New England Sci-Tech, with a small lab fee** of $45 to cover printed materials and general supplies. Having experience in physics, electronics, or amateur radio is helpful, but not required. Space is limited.

Cubes in Space™ (CIS), a program by idoodledu inc., is a global competition. Out of thousands of entries worldwide, under a hundred get picked to fly. However, our mentors, running this program for the past five years, have had a 100% success rate for CIS projects accepted each year.

Students who successfully complete the program and successfully fly a project will receive an official CIS certificate and may list their CIS success in personal resumes, school transcripts, and college applications.

ORIENTATION MEETING

Get to know you, CIS preliminary overview, and registration:
Attend either Friday November 19, 6:30 pm, or Saturday November 20, 3:30 pm.

FRIDAY WORKSHOPS

Eight Fridays, 6:30-7:30 pm:
Lesson 1 – Dec 3, Lesson 2 – Dec 17, Lesson 3 – Jan 7, Lesson 4 – Jan 21, Lesson 5 – Feb 4, Lesson 6 – Feb 11, Lesson 7 – Mar 4, Lesson 8 – Mar 18.

For those projects chosen to fly, there will be 6 additional prep and build days, some optional:
Apr 1, 8, 29, May 13, 20, Jun 3.

For anyone who will need to miss a Friday lesson, you may attend the same lesson on Saturday. Please plan ahead.

SATURDAY WORKSHOPS

Eight Saturdays, 3:30-4:30 pm:
Lesson 1 – Dec 4, Lesson 2 – Dec 18, Lesson 3 – Jan 8, Lesson 4 – Jan 22, Lesson 5 – Feb 5, Lesson 6 – Feb 12, Lesson 7 – Mar 5, Lesson 8 – Mar 19.

For those projects chosen to fly, there will be 6 additional prep and build days, some optional:
Apr 2, 9, 30, May 14, 21, Jun 4.

For anyone who will need to miss a Saturday lesson, you may attend the same lesson on the previous Friday. Please plan ahead.

[Visit https://nescitech.org/product/cubes-in-spacetm/ for more information.]